Last edited by Daibei
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

5 edition of Ethnic labels, Latino lives found in the catalog.

Ethnic labels, Latino lives

identity and the politics of (re) presentation in the United States

by Suzanne Oboler

  • 186 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by University of Minnesota Press in Minneapolis .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hispanic Americans -- Ethnic identity.,
  • Hispanic Americans -- Name.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementSuzanne Oboler.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE184.S75
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22320532M
    ISBN 100816622841, 0816622868

      Only 2% of our respondents said the label accurately describes them, making it the least popular ethnic label among Latinos. Some have speculated that “Latinx” resonates with women and Latino. The truth is that the different labels used to refer to the diverse Spanish-speaking communities and their respective traditions in the United States baffle even adults. This is a reflection of how little people know about the fastest growing minority group in the United States.

    ethnic labels—and the same could be said of racial labels —are terms “used to determine the ethnic group to which respondents [believe] they belonged” in their research (, p. 29). Especially within a nation as diverse as the United States, labels in which certain racial terms or. A study by Nicholas Subtirelu, a Ph.D. student in linguistics at Georgia State University, looked at the changing use of racial labels at The New York elu’s study found that over the past half-century, country-specific terms were gradually replaced by the umbrella terms, like Hispanic and Latino.

    Prominent Latinos sometimes face an “ethnic authenticity” test. Former Massachusetts Senate candidate Gabriel Gomez was called a LINO - a "Latino In Name Only." Gomez said it's because he ran.   People attend a vigil in front of the Masp in Sao Paulo, Brazil on J , in reaction to the mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida.


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Ethnic labels, Latino lives by Suzanne Oboler Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics of (Re)Presentation in the United States [Oboler, Suzanne] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics of (Re)Presentation in the United StatesCited by: Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics of (Re)Presentation in the United States by Oboler, Suzanne(Ap ) Paperback on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics of (Re)Presentation in the United States by Oboler4/5(5). Social labels often take on a life of their own beyond the control of those who coin them or to whom they are applied.

In "Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives" Suzanne Oboler explores the history and current use of the label "Hispanic", as she illustrates the complex meanings that ethnicity has acquired in shaping our lives.

In Ethnic Labels/Latino Lives she splendidly answers this question in a richly textured and empirically dense study of the logic and politics of ethnic labels.

She traces the historical circumstances that generated particular Ethnic labels and national labels, their situational deployment both by the state and local communities, and their long-term. Get this from a library. Ethnic labels Ethnic labels, Latino lives: Ethnic labels and the politics of (re)presentation in the United States.

[Suzanne Oboler] -- Though we have witnessed in recent years the fading of the idealized image of U.S. society as a melting pot, we have also realized that the possibility of recasting it in multicultural terms is.

Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives aims to understand the role ethnic labels play in our society and brings us closer toward actualizing a society that values cultural diversity. Suzanne Oboler, a Peruvian American, is currently assistant professor in the Department of American Civilization at Brown University.

Ethnic labels, Latino lives: identity and the politics of (re)presentation in the United States / Suzanne Oboler University of Minnesota Press Minneapolis Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required.

Book Review Section Suzanne Oboler, Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics of (Re)Presentation in the United States.

Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, Pages. Douglas T. Gurak Cornell University, USA. Pages Published online: 19 Nov "Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives" aims to understand the role that ethnic labels play in our society and brings us closer towards actualizing a society which values cultural diversity.

Publisher: University of Minnesota Press ISBN: Number of pages: Weight: g. History of Latino Ethnic Labels in the US In the current essay we will analyze the case and identities though a social/political lens, describe a history of Latino ethnic labels in the US, and -Identify how this still relates to current socio-political issues affecting Latinos.

7 Cf. Suzanne Oboler, Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics of (Re)presentation in the United States (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, ).

Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics of (Re) Presentation in the United States by Suzanne Oboler avg rating — 21 ratings — published — 2 editions. Discover Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics Of (RE) Presentation In The United States by Suzanne Oboler and millions of other books available at Barnes & Noble.

Shop paperbacks, eBooks, and more!Author: Suzanne Oboler. In “Ethnic labels, Latino Lives” the problem the author tries to contend is that labeling a group “Hispanic” obscures the various social and political experiences of diverse Latino communities within the U.S.

Oboler argues “the ethnic label Hispanic homogenizes the social and political experiences of more than 23 million people of. |a Ethnic labels, Latino lives: |b identity and the politics of (re)presentation in the United States / |c Suzanne Oboler.

|a Minneapolis: |b University of Minnesota Press, |c c Suzanne Oboler is the author of Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives ( avg rating, 21 ratings, 0 reviews, published ), Latinos and Citizenship ( avg r /5.

The ethnonyms Hispanic and Latino are used to refer collectively to the inhabitants of the United States who are of Latin American or Spanish origin (see Hispanic and Latino Americans).The usage of both terms has changed to adapt to a wide range of geographical and historical influences.

The term "Hispanic" was used first; later, some Hispanics in the western United States came to prefer the. For example, people might identify as Latino or another ethnicity. Be clear about whether you are referring to a racial group or to an ethnic group. Race is a social construct that is not universal, so one must be careful not to impose racial labels on ethnic groups.

SUZANNE OBOLER, ETHNIC LABELS, LATINO LIVES: IDENTITY AND THE POLITICS OF (RE)PRESENTATION IN THE UNITED STATES. MINNEAPOLIS: UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PRESS, PAGES. This volume lays out Suzanne Oboler's struggle to arrive at a synthesis of two dis similar perspectives on the meaning of ethnic labels as they are applied to and by.

Contextual Considerations in Ethnic Labeling. From an ecological perspective (Bronfenbrenner ), adolescents’ use of ethnic labels may be determined by the geographic setting in which they reside.A combination of contextual factors, for instance, the social reception of the immigrant receiving community, racial discrimination in schools and neighborhoods, the size, connectedness, and.

Even though OMB has developed a formal definition of Hispanicity, in practice the U.S. Census Bureau and others rely on self-reports to determine ethnicity—someone is Hispanic or Latino if they self-identify as Hispanic or Latino (Passel and Taylor, ).

Using this method, the U.S. Census counted million Hispanics in The history and current use of the label "Hispanic" are discussed in this exploration of the myth of cultural and national homogeneity among people of Latin American descent in the United States.

The historical process of labeling groups of individuals is discussed, and how ethnic labels affect the meaning of citizenship and the struggle for full social participation is illustrated.In "Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives" Suzanne Oboler explores the history and current use of the label "Hispanic", as she illustrates the complex meanings that ethnicity has acquired in shaping our lives and identities.

Exploding the myth of cultural and national homogeneity among Latin Americans, Oboler interviews members of diverse groups who have /5(1).